Metal Making in the 21st Century

Is it still worth it to work on metals? This talk explores how science is starting to help industry—and the benefits of producing better, cheaper, more sustainable material.
  • Arthur Després, Materials Engineering
    Coach House, Green College, UBC

    Monday, September 14, 8-9 pm
    in the series
    Green College Resident Members' Series
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  • Is it still worth it to work on metals? Yes. After being considered an art over the last 5,000 years, the scientific discoveries of the 19th and 20th centuries have turned metal making into a science. In many ways, metals have no rivals: they have exceptional stiffness and toughness, low cost, and good resistance to harsh environments. This talk presents a case study on how science is starting to help industry—producing better, cheaper, more sustainable material.

    Arthur Després is currently a Phd student at UBC. He is a graduate engineer from the faculty of Lyon, France. He finished his diploma in collaboration with the University of Tokyo. Upon returning to France, he worked one year with APERAM, branch of the metallurgical company ArcelorMittal. At UBC, he is trying to improve the properties of application of stainless steels.
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  • Unless otherwise noted, all of our lectures are free to attend and do not require registration.

 

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September 14th, 2015 8:00 PM   through   9:00 PM
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Speaker Series Green College Resident Members' Series
Short Title Metal Making in the 21st Century
Speaker (new) Arthur Després, Materials Engineering
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Speaker Last Name Després
Speaker Affiliation Materials Engineering
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