The Media’s Failure in Reconciliation and the Importance of Authentic Indigenous Voices in Publishing

  • Waubgeshig Rice, journalist and author, Wasauksing First Nation; Michelle Good, author
    Online presentation via Zoom (click here to join)

    Tuesday, March 9, 5-6:30 pm
    in the series
    J. V. Clyne Lectures at Green College, UBC: Indigenous Resurgence and Colonial Fingerprints in the 21st Century
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    2020 was a watershed year for mainstream news media and publishing, with issues of systemic racism in those industries finally coming to the fore. Author and journalist Waubgeshig Rice examines the structural issues in those industries that perpetuate racism, and how the formats and practices of mainstream journalism and literature conflict with the oral traditions of Indigenous cultures and the ramifications of this in the context of reconciliation.


    Waubgeshig Rice is an author and journalist from Wasauksing First Nation. He has written three fiction titles, and his short stories and essays have been published in numerous anthologies. His most recent novel, Moon of the Crusted Snow, was published in 2018 and became a national bestseller. He graduated from Ryerson University’s journalism program in 2002, and spent most of his journalism career with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a video journalist and radio host. He left CBC in 2020 to focus on his literary career. He lives in Sudbury, Ontario with his wife and two sons.


    Michelle Good is of Cree ancestry, a descendent of the Battle River Cree and a member of the Red Pheasant Cree Nation. She has worked with indigenous organizations since she was a teenager and at forty decided to approach that work in a different way obtaining her law degree from UBC at 43. She has practiced law in the public and private sector since then, primarily advocating for Residential School Survivors.

    She graduated from UBC with a Master of Fine Arts Degree in Creative Writing MFA in 2014 where her novel Five Little Indians first started taking shape. Her poetry, and short stories have appeared in a number of publications. Her first novel, Five Little Indians won the HarperCollins/UBC Best New Fiction Prize and her poetry has been included in Best Canadian Poetry in Canada 2016 and Best of the Best Canadian Poetry in Canada 2017.

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When
March 9th, 2021 5:00 PM   through   6:30 PM
Location
Online Lecture via Zoom
BC
Canada
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Speaker Series J. V. Clyne Lectures at Green College, UBC: Indigenous Resurgence and Colonial Fingerprints in the 21st Century
Short Title The Media’s Failure in Reconciliation and the Importance of Authentic Indigenous Voices in Publishing
Speaker (new) Waubgeshig Rice, journalist and author, Wasauksing First Nation; Michelle Good, author
Short Speaker Michelle Good, Waubgeshig Rice
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